Unique as a Snowflake

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Unique as a Snowflake

Patient’s responses to Live Therapeutic Music (LTM) are nearly as unique as
snowflakes. No two are exactly the same. But sometimes, I am amazed at how
patients’ responses are so similar.
On a given day, a patient hearing LTM may experience relaxed respirations or a
reduction in their heart rate. In a subsequent session, the same patient may
experience a lower blood pressure reading, increased Oxygen saturation level, or
simply fall asleep.
Music Practitioners have no stated “goals” when conducting LTM sessions; rather
we simply create a healing environment for the patient through the proper use of
frequency, tone and tempo. A patient’s physiologic response to LTM isn’t based on
what song or style of music is played, but on how the tone and tempo of the music
affects the patient’s parasympathetic nervous system.
Last week at a local hospital, I experienced a phenomenon that I had never
encountered before. Of the seven patients that I played for, each patient fell asleep
during our LTM session. Without exception, they all fell asleep. A few drifted off
almost immediately, while others slowly drifted off to dreamland during the session.
Assuming the patients were on various medications, the LTM simply complemented
the traditional care plan by helping each patient relax and rest.
This week, I played for another cancer patient named Pat who told me that he felt so
bad; he didn’t think he could tolerate any music. His nurse, who was in the room
with me said, “Why don’t you let him play for a few minutes, you might feel better
with a little soft music.” Pat skeptically consented, turned off his TV and closed his
eyes. In less than five minutes, he was sound asleep.
Even if Pat’s nap only lasted 30 minutes, LTM was able to help him sleep and escape
the nausea, which was the side effect of his Chemo treatment. Responses like Pat’s
are why Strings of Mercy continues working to raise awareness of Live Therapeutic
Music while helping change the way we care for those who suffer.

2019-02-26T03:12:02+00:00 August 30th, 2018|Blog Post, Patient Experiences|0 Comments

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